Tag: wikipedia

  • List of linguistic example sentences

    Via wikipedia – List of linguistic example sentences From the “grammar is fun” section of wikipedia, the page includes sentences that explain: Lexical ambiguity: Will Will will Will’s will to Will? (Will Will [a person] will [bequeath] Will’s [second person] will [a document] to Will [a third person]? Alternatively, “Will Will will Will’s will?” Also, […]

  • Conceit via. Wikipedia

    via Wikipedia, Conceit: In literature, a conceit is an extended metaphor with a complex logic that governs a poetic passage or entire poem. By juxtaposing, usurping and manipulating images and ideas in surprising ways, a conceit invites the reader into a more sophisticated understanding of an object of comparison. Extended conceits in English are part […]

  • Estoppel – Wikipedia

    From Wikipedia: Estoppel. Estoppel in its broadest sense is a legal term referring to a series of legal and equitable doctrines that preclude “a person from denying or asserting anything to the contrary of that which has, in contemplation of law, been established as the truth, either by the acts of judicial or legislative officers, […]

  • ‘Azimuth’ via Wikipedia

    via: Azimuth – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. An azimuth i/ˈæzɪməθ/; from Arabic السمت as‑samt, meaning “a way, a part, or quarter” is an angular measurement in a spherical coordinate system. The vector from an observer origin to a point of interest is projected perpendicularly onto a reference plane; the angle between the projected vector and […]

  • Wikipedia Is Quietly Moving Women Off Their American Novelist Page

    From Jezebel: Wikipedia Is Quietly Moving Women Off Their American Novelist Page If you go to Wikipedia’s page for American Novelists, you might notice something strange: Of the first 100 authors listed, only a small handful of them are women. You could potentially blame this on the fact that there simply are more famous male […]

  • ‘The Wild Hunt’ via wikipedia

    via Wikipedia, the Wild Hunt: The Wild Hunt is an ancient folk myth prevalent across Northern, Western and Central Europe. The fundamental premise in all instances is the same: a phantasmal, spectral group of huntsmen with the accoutrements of hunting, with horses and hounds in mad pursuit across the skies or along the ground, or […]

  • ‘Beasts of battle’ via Wikipedia

    Via wikipedia: Beasts of battle: The Beasts of battle is a poetic trope in Old English and Old Norse literature. It consists of the wolf, the raven, and the eagle, traditional animals accompanying the warriors to feast on the bodies of the slain. It occurs in eight Old English poems and in the Old Norse […]

  • ‘The Ancient of Days’, ‘Thumos’ via wikipedia

    via wikipedia: The Ancient of Days The title “Ancient of Days” has been used as a source of inspiration in art and music, denoting the Creator’s aspects of eternity combined with perfection. William Blake’s watercolour and relief etching entitled “The Ancient of Days” is one such example. The Ancient of Days is the title of […]

  • Biomimicry, the law of unintended consequences, Chinese water torture

    Via wikipedia: Biomimicry Biomimicry or biomimetics is the examination of nature, its models, systems, processes, and elements to emulate or take inspiration from in order to solve human problems. The term biomimicry and biomimetics come from the Greek words bios, meaning life, and mimesis, meaning to imitate. Similar terms include bionics. Law of unintended consequences […]

  • ‘Doctor Who’ via wikipedia

    Wikipedia article on Dr. Who. I understood very little about the program, other than I caught a few episodes on cable when I was a kid in the 1980s, and had a crush on Sarah Jane Smith. An article like this would have been very helpful when I was young. It has since become one […]

  • Occam’s Razor

    Occam’s Razor: one should not increase, beyond what is necessary, the number of entities required to explain anything. Via Wikipedia: Occam’s razor (also written as Ockham’s razor and in Latin lex parsimoniae) is a problem-solving principle devised by William of Ockham (c. 1287–1347), who was an English Franciscan friar and scholastic philosopher and theologian. The […]

  • ‘Cambrian Explosion’

    Remember when you were a kid, and all of the sudden, for no apparent reason, you shot up several inches one summer? Like growth wasn’t a slow, glacial process but an abrupt one? Sort of like some of the theories on evolution that suggest mutations aren’t as gradual as we think. (A Cambrian Explosion, per […]